Preventable crime

by Jay Bender

In police work, not every task is exciting or even interesting. Still, every job has a chance to help you look at things in new ways.

For example, I was recently tasked with reviewing and scanning tickets and test forms into the computer from out BAC Datamaster. The Datamaster is commonly referred to as a “breathalyzer,” which, as you know, is used to the determine the percentage of alcohol in a person’s system after they have been arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol.

As I went through the records, I started to think about how a drunk driving arrest can completely derail a life, any life. One of the aspects I noticed is that there was really no common denominator among the suspects. Ages ranged from the early 20s to the late 70s. Some suspects came from very affluent neighborhoods, and some did not. Some offenders registered blood alcohol contents just above the legal limit of .08, and many blew two or event three times that limit. Some were so intoxicated you might wonder how they could walk, let alone drive.

And even if that OVI offense injured nobody, the impact on the suspect will be immediate and costly. They will have to post bond to be released from jail, and they will have to appear in court, which will likely be only the first of many court appearances. For some, the court costs and fines are insignificant. For some, they will be insurmountable. For still others, it will be the embarrassment that hurts the most. Regardless, an arrest will affect you, and be assured that it can happen to you…it is not always somebody else from somewhere else!

What these arrests do have in common is that the crime in question is completely preventable with a simple formula: Don’t drink and drive. Even in extreme moderation, you are taking an unnecessary risk. In 24 years of police work, I’ve never met anybody who regretted NOT drinking.

2 thoughts on “Preventable crime

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  1. Excellent article! Taking it a step further, not that you asked for my opinion 🙂 ,I think the details of what happens “after the COPS moment” of getting arrested for OVI, or any offense, really, need more exposure. That whole process alone might be a good deterrent for the reasons you outlined.

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